Commodification of welfare

Firstly it will explain what is meant by the commodification of welfare and why this project was chosen as a study piece. It will give an overview fitting the subject into a historical context mainly in Britain but with some international connections, then leading to the present day. As the text progresses there will be correlations made from different sources regarding certain processes, phrases and models that are milestones in the development this study.

Commodification of welfare

They explain how each of these countries experienced an acceleration in the operation of disciplinary neoliberalism — through punitive regimes of surveillance and sanctions — and consider the implications of these contemporary welfare policies. The Great Recession saw the unravelling of a financialised growth model into a full-blown crisis by In the aftermath, what is apparent is Commodification of welfare financialised capitalism in unison with neoliberalism not only survived but thrived.

The current configuration and integration of neoliberalism and financialisation, and their penetration into every aspect of everyday life, is contributing to a transformation of prevailing societal norms within Anglo-liberal capitalism.

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In our research we suggest that coercive commodification is a social policy tool that is becoming increasingly embedded in how the instabilities of the Anglo-liberal model are governed and in how disciplinary neoliberalism evolves.

Focusing on Ireland, the UK, and the US, we highlight the ways in which these processes are playing out in these three countries. Disciplinary Neoliberalism, coercive commodification, and financialisation: The forms and techniques of disciplinary neoliberalism emerging from these two dimensions of power can be demonstrated in a number of ways.

Government intervention following the onset of the Great Recession reflected and reinforced the logic of disciplinary neoliberalism and the disparities between the global and the local spheres.

Particularly marked in the case of Ireland, without control of monetary policy, the ECB essentially acted as an agent of disciplinary neoliberalism whilst its wider use of quantitative easing proved a boon for the financial sector.

The concept of coercive commodification resonates with how welfare states, and particularly liberal welfare states, have evolved and the rise, crisis, and further entrenchment of disciplinary neoliberalism post recession. For Esping-Andersen in his work on de-commodification, the emphasis was on the absence of compulsion from the way that individuals engage with the market and sell their labour.

Commodification of welfare

Pierson focuses on re-commodification and the dismantling of those aspects of welfare states that provided some protection from market pressures. Contemporary welfare policy and practice in Anglo-liberal welfare states may now more aptly be denoted as coercive commodification through which a nexus between housing, work, and welfare is being forged.

It is increasingly an orbit that is closing down any vestiges of choice and stripping back subsequent policy buffers. At the same time this is a process that is evolving with varying degrees of intensity and ideological fervour, longevity, and historical trajectories across the US, the UK and Ireland.

The Irish case is a more novice turn, following the severity of its recent phase of disciplinary neoliberalism, which has reduced its capacity to implement compensatory social policies that tended to exist alongside a more explicitly neoliberalised economic regime.

Such patterns are most extreme in the US where the commodification of housing support has reached a point where publicly provided housing has practically disappeared and much of the welfare regime rests on income and housing tax credits which favour those in work.

Trends in the UK track elements of the US experience, as the erosion of the benefit system since the s has been replaced by an increasingly punitive regime of surveillance, sanctions, and deterrence whilst the recent evolution of tax credits to the universal credit system heralds a tougher regime.

Such changes intersect with the coercive commodification of the social housing system, where housing need is increasingly channelled into the private rental sector under a tightened Housing Benefit regime, with reforms under the Localism Act diminishing the security traditionally attached to publicly provided housing.

Though not as punitive as the US or UK examples, recent changes in Ireland bear the imprint of coercive commodification.

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Not least of which is the shift to reliance on a poorly regulated and increasingly financialised private rental market in place of publicly provided housing. This has heaped housing risk and insecurity on renters and is directly fuelling growing homelessness.B-Corps: The Commodification of Social Welfare September 16, Troy Andrew Hallisey Leave a Comment Among the many issues facing the nonprofit sector today, one of the biggest has to be the questioning of its very purpose.

Decommodification is the strength of social entitlements and citizens` degree of immunization from market dependency. Decommodification is the process of viewing utilities as an entitlement, rather than as a commodity that must be paid or traded for.

This article adopts an operational definition of de-commodification that emphasises its significance for the welfare of individuals.

It explores what the definition indicates about different forms of home ownership and renting found in industrialised countries. Decommodification is the strength of social entitlements and citizens` degree of immunization from market dependency. Decommodification is the process of viewing utilities as an entitlement, rather than as a commodity that must be paid or traded for.

Decommodification is the strength of social entitlements and citizens' degree of immunization from market dependency. Decommodification is the process of viewing utilities as an entitlement, rather than as a commodity that must be paid or traded for. Ireland, the UK and the USA are heterogeneous examples of liberal worlds of welfare capitalism yet all three countries were deeply implicated in the global financial crisis.

Commodification - Wikipedia